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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 14
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KQEH (PBS) 7
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English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the nation's busiest port complex is back in business after an eight-day strike halted operations. the ports of los angeles and long beach, california reopened today after port operators and the worker's union reached an agreement late tuesday. the union said it won new protections against job outsourcing. port officials said during the walkout, they were unable to move some $760 million worth of cargo a day. wall street had a day of ups and downs and investors watched economic reports and weighed chances for a fiscal cliff deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 82 points to close at 13,034. but the nasdaq fell nearly 23 points to close at 2,973. the day's big loser was apple, down more than 6% over concerns that smart phone sales are lagging. former texas congressman jack brooks has died. he served 42 years in the house, and was in the dallas motorcade on november 22nd, 1963 when president kennedy was assassinated. hours later, brooks was on hand as vice president and fellow texan lyndon johnson was sworn in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1
"battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when residents of this port city wake up, even if there wasn't a storm that night, they regularly find some streets flooded from high tides. it is a far cry from the storm surges brought by sandy further up the coast, but that super- storm, which hit the week before election day, brought to the surface the issue of rising sea levels, the vulnerability of coastal cities and what can be done to protect them. in national exit polls, 64% of voters said that president obama's response to the hurricane was a factor in their decision. >> what i will be doing in the next several months is having wide ranging conversations with scientists, engineers and elected officials to find out what more can we do. >> reporter: mr. obama might look to norfolk, where they have been having those conversations for years. >> as we get more high tides and tides seem to get higher and we get more of these storms and they seem to come with a little more fury we get more and more water in our city as the days go by, so we are taking it very seriously. we talk about it nearly monthl
luke's hospital just outside the capital port-au-prince, this doctor says since hurricane sandy admissions have doubled from 20 to 40 patients each day. >> most of the new cases are coming from further up the hill in places where we had not seen them before. i'm not positive but perhaps the wells there have been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the bigge
is america's top producing fishing port and sea scallops-- another species vulnerable to acidification-- makes up 77% of their production. >> shell fishing is really a way of life for many of those families and much of that community and taking that away kind of further homogenizes our country. we could see changes in the demographics of the community as working families move away and look for other opportunities. >> sreenivasan: sarah cooley studies the socio-economic impacts of altered oceans at woods hole oceanographic institution in massachusetts. she and other researchers project acidification could reduce u.s. shellfish harvests by as much as 25% over the next 50 years. >> we'll look back and say oh things used to be like this and i hope that's not the case. i hope we can actually preserve those pockets of individuality in the country that make it so great by finding these regional solutions can help out different regions to preserve their ways of life. >> what we are looking at is probably on the order of tens to hundreds of millions of dollars just related to the shellfish fish
because they know them the best then we work together. >> in the sprawling port-au-prince slum, he says the group is partnering with the community to build homes in a sea of shacks and squall already. they're built on the principle that if you wait to do things right nothing will get done for years. prolonging the suffering. >> we're investing in the purchase of time, there's simple block structures, we make most of them ourselves, simple aluminum -- more towards normal than anything that they have known but just buying time while the people with big money and big plans and interwoven network of organizations can do a proper urban development. that's what we're doing. >> they're also building a new health care facility here, all told about 1800 haitians work for the mission begun by him, hundreds of thousands have been served in orphanages, schools and hospitals. funding comes from individuals, foundations and government grants. this year he was awarded the $1 million opus prize given to a faith-based social entrepreneur out of the minnesota-based opus foundation. he does not see his w
and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death count climbed to 16. the system dumped a foot or more of snow in parts of pennsylvania, upstate new york and new hampshire. in some places, snow brought road travel to a standstill. at the same time, operations at major airports improved, with far fewer delays than earlier this week. in india, the embattled prime minister remained under pressure to take action against sexual assaults after a gang rape this month triggered violent protests. manmohan singh promised a thorough review of india's rape laws and efforts to expedite trials. meanwhile, police moved to quell a rally by about 500 students protesting the treatment of women as
holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving fla
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)